‹ Back

Bloomberg News | January 28, 2022

Bloomberg News Features BanQu

BanQu’s CEO, Ashish Gadnis, explains the importance of making smallholder farmers—like those in Ecuador—visible in supply chains for which they source.

In its recent Quicktake release, Bloomberg explores how blockchain solutions are eliminating inefficiencies and increasing transparency in global supply chains. In that $50 trillion industry, tracing raw materials is extremely complex given a continued reliance on paper-based records. Non-crypto blockchain can remove uncertainty, tracing a product’s journey “from grain to bottle or from thread to shirt” digitally. The Bloomberg feature highlights how BanQu achieves this with smallholder farmers supplying corn, barley, and rice to produce beer for Cerveceria Nacional’s Nuestra Siembra label (an AB InBev subsidiary).

BanQu’s CEO, Ashish Gadnis, explains the importance of making smallholder farmers—like those in Ecuador—visible in supply chains for which they source. Giving them a digital economic history through blockchain (and copies of receipts through SMS to those without a smartphone) provides them with proof of their business transactions with global brands. This builds an economic history for the farmer that gives them access to loans and bank accounts and allows the brand to ensure they got paid for their contributions. “From the brand’s perspective, if you really want your supply chain to be traceable and transparent, you need to know who the farmer is, and blockchain can do that.”

Contact our press team

Only press inquiries will receive a response. If you have questions about the site or app, please visit BanQu's Help Center

Email Press Team

Request a Demo

Our friendly team will book an hour with you to walk through an example of the platform, targeting your specific use case.

BanQu Demo